pentrich

George Weightman was one of four ringleaders of the ill fated Pentrich Revolution of 1817, the last revolution in England. He died, aged 68, in a colonial cottage adjacent to this spot in 1865. (Southern side of railway bridge on Terralong Street.)

The idea of revolution gained momentum after the Napoleonic Wars when recession, poverty, bad government and an extravagent monarchy inspired groups of people intent on political reform. Unfortunately these groups were infiltrated by government spies and history was to prove the Pentrich Revolution to be an exercise in entrapment by the British Government.

Weightman was the only one of the four ringleaders to escape execution. He was transported for life and spent much of his time at Jamberoo and Kiama. Although he proved to be worthy and upstanding citizen, Weightman never returned to England or saw his wife and family again.

Where you are standing was once a general store owned by Joseph King. The attached house was where George Weightman lived for some time until his death in 1865. The building was demolished around 1900 to make way for the railway.

plaque returns

The round plaque states:

PENTRIDGE REVOLUTION JUNE 9 1817

MM
To mark the life of Pentrich Rebel George WEightman. Died Kiama 1865

If you had seen them around, you are welcome to have a look at the collection of plaques in the district.

Return to Coastal Plaques historical-plaques48

 Storm-Bay1In its pre-colonial state, the area around Kiama would have yielded a rich variety of food and other resources for local Aboriginal people. With the arrival of Europeans, vegetation was cleared, food sources became scarce, diseases were introduced and a way of life that had developed over thousands of years was destroyed.

From Wollongong to Jamberoo, the road was a mere day track through a forest of tropical foliage; gum trees 200 [feet] or more in height, gigantic India-rubber trees with broad shining green leaves, lofty cabbage palms, and many other kinds of tree towered above us, so that their tops made a twilight canopy, impenetrable to the sunlight, save for an infrequent clearing in the forest made by the settler’s axe. Huge lianas, some as thick as a man’s arm, hung sown snakelike from the trees. MILL MANAGER’S DAUGHTER (source unknown)

 

This plaque is one of many found around the district. The plaques discribe the history of their locations. They were commissioned by Kiama Council in 2009.

If you had seen them around, you are welcome to have a look at the collection of plaques in the district.

Return to Coastal Plaques historical-plaques48

 

 

Pilots-Cottage1The Kiama Pilot’s Cottage was the residence of the local harbour pilots from 1881 to 1981.

My father had many duties . . . he had to send the weather report to Sydney every day, check on shipping entering the harbour, also fishing vessels, collect mooring fees and keep a log book of all comings and goings. He also had to train men in rescue work in case of ship wreck . . . In those days the lighthouse had gas cylinders . . . lit every evening at dusk, earlier if the weather was bad. He also had to warn shipping or big liners in stormy weather of the dangers of coming too close by signalling on the flag pole. Mrs Hilda Gibson, daughter of Captain Robert Miller (Officer in Charge 1918–1938)

The Pilot’s Cottage is now home to a museum and the Kiama and District Historical Society. The entrance is at the rear of the building.

 

You are welcome to have a look at the collection of plaques in the district.

Return to Coastal Plaques historical-plaques48

 

Robertson-Basin1Between 1849 and 1855 numerous applications and petitions were made by the citizens of the Kiama district for increased accommodation at the harbour. Their pleas were finally heard and the Robertson Basin was officially opened by Miss Charles on the deck of the Illawarra Steam Navigation Company’s ship ‘Hunter’ in 1876.

The construction of the Robertson Basin had a profound impact on the industrial history of the Kiama district. The blasted and excavated stone prompted the advent of stone crushing with the view to its use in road construction. It led to an influx of non-agricultural workers and started the blue metal industry.

This plaque is one of many found around the district. The plaques discribe the history of their locations. They were commissioned by Kiama Council in 2009.

If you had seen them around, you are welcome to have a look at the collection of plaques in the district.

Return to Coastal Plaques historical-plaques48

 

 

 

Welcome-to-Coastal-walk1This section of the Kiama Coast Walk takes a dramatic, coast-hugging route between Werri Lagoon and Kiama
Heights. It is part of a walk that extends north to Minnamurra and south to Gerringong's Boat Harbour.  The surroundings are rich in history and geological interest; other signs along the way unravel some of the area's mysteries.

Route markers are located at approximately 1km intervals. However there is no formed track and visitors need to exercise extreme caution near steep slopes and cliff edges. Children should be supervised at all times. Please note that Werri Lagoon is sometimes open to the sea. At such times the walk will be closed at Werri Lagoon.


Werri Lagoon to Loves Bay
Distance: 12 km return
Time: 5 hr return
Grade: Moderate (Class 4)
Please wear sturdy shoes and a sun hat. Take plenty of water and food as the creek water is not suitable for drinking. There are no toilet facilities en route. Please note that this area is very exposed and subject to strong winds. Dogs must be kept on leash.

This plaque is one of many found around the district. The plaques discribe the history of their locations. They were commissioned by Kiama Council in 2009.

If you had seen them around, you are welcome to have a look at the collection of plaques in the district.

Return to Coastal Plaques historical-plaques48